The latest Chevrolet Camaro is a lesson in economies of scale

Although Chevy sells about as many Camaros as Ford does Mustangs, a rivalry that dates back five decades

the Camaro benefits from a vastly larger pool of engineering and development expertise.

That’s not to say we’re dumping on Ford — quite the contrary.

The point here is that Ford’s lineup includes just one rear-wheel-drive sporty car motivated by a thundering V8 engine

 while the Camaro counts among its General Motors kissing cousins a pair of big-buck Cadillacs funded by hefty development budgets

Additionally, Camaro’s heart of gold — a practically flame-throwing V8 that makes us want to sing “Born in the USA” over and over

shared with the Corvette and, with a few modifications, GM’s big trucks and SUVs like the Chevy Tahoe and Cadillac Escalade.

It’s no surprise that the 2022 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 is the fastest of the pony cars in Chevy’s stable.

The 650-horsepower brute isn’t just a track-toy; it has drag strip credentials, too.

The last Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 that Car and Driver tested dispatched a run to 60 mph in just 3.4 seconds

a quarter-mile sprint in 11.5 seconds. Not bad for a muscle car that can manage a 1.17-g result in skidpad handling tests.

The latest Chevrolet Camaro is a lesson in economies of scale: Although Chevy sells about as many Camaros as Ford does Mustangs

a rivalry that dates back five decades, the Camaro benefits from a vastly larger pool of engineering and development expertise.